Calls For 'Red Flag' Gun Laws Grow Louder After Recent Mass Shootings

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Calls For 'Red Flag' Gun Laws Grow Louder After Recent Mass Shootings
In the wake of mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, the push to pass so-called "red flag" gun laws is picking up steam.
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"We have to empower people to get help for family or loved ones who may be a danger to themselves or a danger to others," Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said.

In the wake of mass shootings in Texas and Ohio that left dozens of people dead or injured, the push to pass so-called "red flag" gun laws is picking up steam on both the state and federal level.

Days after the shootings, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Rep. Mike Turner voiced their support for red flag laws and called on state lawmakers to pass them.

Sens. Lindsey Graham and Richard Blumenthal have teamed up on bipartisan legislation that would assist and encourage states to adopt such measures.

And even President Donald Trump mentioned red flag laws during televised remarks from the White House on Monday.

"We must make sure that those judged to pose a grave risk to public safety do not have access to firearms, and that if they do, those firearms can be taken through rapid due process," President Trump said.

More than a dozen states have already passed some version of a red flag law, which allows authorities to temporarily take firearms away from people who are determined to be a danger to themselves or others.

Gun control groups and mental health advocates have applauded these laws as life-saving measures.

Even the National Rifle Association said in a statement it welcomes President Trump's call "to address the root causes of the horrific acts of violence that have occurred in our country."

But while research suggests the laws are helpful in preventing suicides, their impact on homicides and mass shootings is unclear.

As one expert told NBC: "Red flag laws are one important tool, but I don't think you'll find a single researcher who will claim that they are the panacea of gun violence. They're not."

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.